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What should I know about the internal cabling

This article is intended to provide a basic understanding of internal wiring and will walk you through different aspects of cabling infrastructure in residential and commercial buildings. 

General scheme

If you’re living in a house

Let's take a look at the way the internal cabling is usually arranged in single residential dwellings (see the picture below). The DSL line arrives to the entry point located in technical area and is connected—either via the socket or directly—to the modem/router, from which the signal is distributed to rooms and areas using ethernet cables. 

The technical area is the focal point of the indoor telecommunications facility. It terminates all the cables and provides a convenient way of connecting the individual room sockets to a central network switch device (modem/router or switch). It should be located at the same place as the entry point of the housing is located (usually in the same room as the electricity meter) and be installed on an interior wall or an insulated exterior wall at a height of at least 100 cm from the floor.

The area also needs to be protected from moisture and dust and be ventilated in order to avoid overheating.

The technical area normally includes:

  • Proximus entry point
  • TF2007 socket acting as NTP to which the signal is patched (learn what it is and why it may be needed)
  • Modem/router and, if needed, ethernet switch
  • Power sockets for the equipment
  • Patch panel to mount and connect the cables (optional)
  • Enough space to accommodate additional network infrastructure you have or that you may install later
     

What is entry point and where it's located

The entry point facilitates the transition from outdoor (underground or aerial) cabling to indoor cabling. The lead-in cabling is connected to the entry box at the external wall of the building and will be interconnected to the indoor termination equipment via one or more indoor “tie” cables.

For a single residential dwelling, the building entry point is likely to be located near the electricity enclosure (meter panel or switchboard) to ensure the access to the box and to keep it away from any gas cylinders that may be installed at the building.

Check out our guide on how to identify the entry point and the signal on it.

In order to guarantee an optimal connection, we recommend using standard 4-pair Cat5e (UTP) data cables.

Few guidelines on how to mount the cables:

  • It is recommended to embed the cables in the living rooms and to leave them visible and easily accessible in the technical areas.
  • Avoid electrical wiring as much as possible. AC cables can interfere with ethernet if you run them together. When you run UTP in parallel with electrical cables, and the communication will likely become noisy and garbled.

Ethernet jacks should be of the same category as internal wiring and at least cat5e.


If you’re living in an apartment building

In case of multi-dwelling residential buildings, offices complexes or shopping centres, the path the line takes is the same, except for the building entry point being located in the central common technical location shared with other residents. This adds the necessity of patching the line from the main to individual technical areas.

 

The entry point facilitates the transition from outdoor (underground or aerial) cabling to indoor cabling. The lead-in cabling is connected to the entry box at the external wall of the building and will be interconnected to the indoor termination equipment via one or more indoor cables.

In multi-dwelling residential buildings, offices complexes or shopping centres the entry point is usually located at the central common technical location.

Here is how the entry point may look like in the apartment building:

Usually pre-cabling is done from the entry point to intermediate technical location near the units (apartments, shops or offices) using multi-core cables. 

TF2007 sockets are usually installed in the apartment, shop or office, to where the signal needs to be patched from the entry point.

In some cases it’s possible to patch the signal via the internal cable that was being used for your previous connection, but we do recommend to ensure that there is a free copper pair going from the entry point to your technical area or equipment room.

The technical area is the focal point of the indoor telecommunications facility. It terminates all the cables and provides a convenient way of connecting the individual room sockets to a central network switch device (modem/router or switch).

The area needs to be protected from moisture and dust and be ventilated in order to avoid overheating.

The technical area normally includes:

  • TF2007 socket acting as NTP to which the signal is patched (learn what it is and why it may be needed)
  • Modem/router and, if needed, ethernet switch
  • PBX (optional)
  • Power sockets for the equipment
  • Patch panel to mount and connect the cables (optional)
  • Enough space to accommodate additional network infrastructure you have or that you may install later

In order to guarantee an optimal connection, we recommend using standard Cat5e (UTP) data cables.

Few guidelines on how to mount the cables:

  • It is recommended to embed the cables in the living rooms and to leave them visible and easily accessible in the technical areas.
  • Avoid electrical wiring as much as possible. AC cables can interfere with ethernet if you run them together. When you run UTP in parallel with electrical cables, and the communication will likely become noisy and garbled.

Ethernet jacks should be of the same category as internal wiring and at least cat5e.


FAQ

Cat5e supports speeds up to 1000 Mbps and is perfectly fine for most local networks.

Cat5 cable is now no longer recommended for new installations.

The maximum allowed length of a Cat5e cable is 100 meters.

You can purchase them at your local hardware store. However, if the works are done by a professional cabler, they should be able to easily provide you the cable you need. 

Any local electrician is able to do such work.

In case of multi-dwelling residential buildings, offices complexes or shopping centres, the works need to be done under supervision of building owner or a person responsible for internal wiring.

In order to let you use ISDN PBX on edpnet connection, we usually install OneAccess IAD, the device that simulates ISDN network and is equipped with either BRI or PRI ports.

IAD will be connected to the modem/router and will normally be located in the same technical area as the latter. If your PBX is situated in another area, ensure that you have free Cat5e UTP cabling in order to connect the devices.

Just contact our customer service, we'll be happy to assist you!

Last updated on Jul 16, 2019 | Tags: